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Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Lyrics for John Mayer: WANNABE VAMPIRE GIRL


She walks the red carpet

In masquerade

And she knows it

Yeh she knows it

The wannabe vampire girl


Hidden in hoodies

Slouchin towards LA town

Stumblin through paps

Who would run her down

And watch her die

Like Princess Di

Not rape her

Jes kill her

Not rape her

Jes kill her

Watchin her die

Through a lense's eye

Watchin her die

Like Princess Di


But the wannabe vampire girl

She walks the red carpet

In masquerade

And she knows it

Yeah she knows it

Just for you

Just for you

Can't touch her now

Can't touch her now



She walks the red carpet


And she knows it

Yeah she knows it

The wannabe vampire girl

Can't touch her now




Copyright Janet Abbey 2010

Sunday, July 17, 2011

The PC Feminist Word Police - The Dominating Discourse of Feminism and Their Censorship Techniques

This is from another rob site. It is an example 

of how authoritarian - read fascist - the 

Feminist Discourse really is. OMG to use the 

word RAPE in a different way than a woman 

getting banged against her will is a huge NO-

NO for the PC Feminists.


Well fuck those cunts! How dare they censor anyone's words! And those of another woman! As if meaning doesn't migrate through time and signs and intonations all the goddamn time. These cunts are so literal they remind me of men. Hmmmmm. As Lacan said, "How do you know  she's a woman?" Maybe I was wrong. Maybe they aren't cunts after all.


Standing Up For Kristen Stewart in a Personal Way


Here is the original site : http://rpattzgirl-fortheloveofrpattz.blogspot.com/2010/06/standing-up-for-kristen-stewart-in.html?zx=34b71a06ad4a8ea7 Harder to read but it does have a lot of comments.


I'm stepping away from my normal Rob lusting posts to talk about RAPE, and a comment that Kristen made.

In a recent interview with ELLE UK Kristen was quoted as saying this:
“It's so... The photos are so… I feel like I'm looking at someone being raped. A lot of the time I can't handle it,” the 20-year-old actress said when asked how she feels about being photographed in her everyday life. “I never expected that this would be my life.”

Stewart further explained that life as a celebrity can become a too intense at any given moment because the cameras can be plentiful and ruthless.

"What you don't see are the cameras shoved in my face and the bizarre intrusive questions being asked, or the people falling over themselves, screaming and taunting to get a reaction,” she lamented.

That comment has created a shit storm of epic proportions, and she's being verbally raped now by so much hate and criticism.

Katherine Hull, a spokesperson on behalf of Rape and Incest National Network (R.A.I.N.N.) thinks so, telling FOX411.com that “Kristen Stewart's comments are regrettable. Portraying a rape survivor in the film ‘Speak’ should have led her to use a more appropriate metaphor to describe the intrusive nature of the paparazzi. Rape is more than an intrusion, it's a violent crime, that causes serious long term mental health effects for victims.”

Similarly, Margaret Lazarus, the executive director of RapeIs.org, who has written extensively about violence against women, thinks Stewart may need to reevaluate her word choice the next time she sounds off to the press.

“Rape is a violation in which one has no choice. A star seeking publicity has choices,” Lazarus told Fox411.com. “Although rape involves loss of privacy, loss of privacy does not constitute rape. Let's use a little logical thinking here.”

Does this look like she's choosing this kind of treatment??? And these are not even the worst ones.



Although she may regret using that word, RAPE now, it's certainly an apt description of how her life is. Because she chooses to be an actress, and to possibly be linked with the hottest man in the world, she's asking for this?

As a rape victim, I can understand why some people would be "upset" over her word choice. But now they're raping her in the media, on blogs, twitter, and probably facebook.

Yes, rape is a violent crime. Paparazzi chasing you in a car, shoving you, shoving people to get to you, screaming obscenities at you to get a reaction is also a form of violence, and I get why she said that.

Rape is also about power, and taking that power away from the victim. Losing your right to say NO. Do you think Kristen can say NO? Do you think it would do any good if she did? Nope. Then they call her a moody bitch. Awkward. Unable to form a coherent sentence in public. Maybe it's because her skirt was too short. She asked for it right? By her choice of profession?

I said this recently on another blog, we've become stunted as a human race because we can't say anything anymore without offending this group, or that group, or this culture. When did we become so weak?

Please stop the hate...and think about how you would feel to live her life. Take away the money, the glamour, the fame, the boyfriend, and walk a mile in her shoes.

Sunday, July 03, 2011

The Tree of Life by Terrence Malick and The Paintings of Diane Burko

Diane Burko


Diane Burko - Volcano Series: 2001 by Discover Channel: Volcano Vacations
from Diane Burko on Vimeo.

Diane Burko
Diane and I go back a long time, since she was an MFA student at Penn. She has spent her entire career doing landscape paintings, very unusual ones. Flying over glaciers, mountains and volcanoes she has recorded our planet in a way no one else has. As it has turned out she has become a witness to the destruction of what are some of the most beautiful inaccessible landscapes on earth. The world has been willing her in this journey as it was not her intention that she would ever be documenting a lost world. We can only be grateful to her for doing this.

Diane Burko
Her images are very like those in Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life. So many moving in time images resonating with Burko's paintings. The film is a wonder to see as are Burko's paintings. In the film I wept in surprise for seemingly no reason at all, just the sheer beauty of moving paintings, abstract, expressionistic, and realistic all at the same time before my eyes. The music is classical, haunting and reaches somewhere you haven't been in a long time. The relief in seeing a film where the music doesn't tell you how you are supposed to be feeling. Music that is just there, simply there.

Spencer Tunick Greenpeace Installation
And then I come to the Installations of Spencer Tunick with all his naked bodies. And his Greenpeace Installation coupled with Burko's glacier paintings. Malick's The Tree of Life is not easily classified so why bother. It is an experience like a Robert Wilson opera. You are aware that you can feel yourself breathe while watching it.

Diane Burko




Diane Burko

Review: The Tree of Life Terrence Malick


The Tree of Life fulfills the promise that the technology of film reproduction promised. It cannot be discussed within the dominant discourse of film criticism.  It is a Foucaudian cut in the history of film. This film is a miracle. Time has slowed for us in this film. We inhabit our own lost time or a time we never knew. The experience is the same as reading In Search of Lost Time by Proust.

The dialectic rhetoric does not apply to it. When reviewers discuss it in words that portray it as revered, loved, adored, a prayer, a revelation contrasted with boring, hated, intolerable, and walk-outs, their flat earth thinking is displayed. When they go on to wade into the interpretive psychological swamp of Oedipal relations between the boy and his father, they are done for. 

Synopsis

The film follows the life journey of the eldest son, Jack, through the innocence of childhood to his disillusioned adult years as he tries to reconcile a complicated relationship with his father. Jack finds himself a lost soul in the modern world, seeking answers to the origins and meaning of life while questioning the existence of faith. Through Malick's signature imagery, we see how both brute nature and spiritual grace shape not only our lives as individuals and families, but all life. (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
It sounds good doesn't it? Freud himself lamented against this tendency, in his time, in his essay Wild Analysis. What is revealed is a complete ignorance of Foucault's The Archaeology of Knowledge and The Discourse on Language a long detailed analysis against the futility of psychological, historical and scientific interpretation, Jean Baudrillard's dismantling of it, and Susan Sontag's great essay Against Interpretation shredding it, as only she can.  This is the reason contemporary reviewers are so inept, so complained about, so uninformed, etc etc etc. And also why they are taken to task, disagreed with, praised, and all the other aspects of the dialectics. 

We are no longer in liner time. There is no longer any orderly progression which depends on linear time. We are moving into simulation. When simulation becomes total, we will be in Virtual Reality, which is irreversible. The last World War is being fought before our eyes and ears. It is the war of Speed described by Virilio.

Baudrillard in Fatal Strategies suggests opposing speed with extreme slowness. And Tree of Life is obeying his dictum. We become immersed in a world of slowness. A world of lost time now. A time when there was contemplation, when connections could be made, when cause and effect linkages were perceived, when meaning existed independent of media manipulation, when the dialectic ruled. Values, aesthetics, rules, ritual, the law, were all a part of human behavior in Western societies. We see the beginnings of disintegration in this film. The father cannot live in a post World War II with his values intact and neither can his son in his. This has little to do with Oedipal conflict.

Walter Benjamin's seminal essay The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction (Illuminations pp 217-251) warns us what to expect. Malick has taken notice. He doesn't disappoint.

I saw it in Springfield Missouri at the independent film theatre The Moxie. I am grateful for their presence here in the Ozarks. What was astonishing was the faces of the audience as the lights went on at the end. Every face was bathed in beauty, all 21st century angst removed as if by magic. I saw traces of an unhoped for joy on them.